Demo Blog

4-Step Installation CountDown Timer

by Kang Ricky on Nov.22, 2009, under

Step installation: 1. Choose one of the four CountDown Timer skins 2. Set the time parameters for the component (the upcoming event, GMT offset, recurrence, etc) 3. Set CountDown Timer visual appearance and choose the appropriate color gamma 4. Copy the ready HTML code for pasting into your website
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Perkembangan E-Commerce di indonesia

by Kang Ricky on Nov.22, 2009, under

Dalam perkembangan E-Commerce di indonesia,memiliki tantangan-tantangan yaitu: 1.KULTUR .Masyarakat indonesia,yang masih belum terbiasa dengan belanja katalog. .Masih harus melihat secara fisik atau memegang barang yang akan di jual. .Masih senang menawarkan harga yang akan di jual. 2.KEPERCAYAAN. .Kepercayaan antara penjual dan pembeli masih tipis. .Kepercayaan kepada pembayaran elektronik masih kurang. .Penggunaan masih kurang.
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What is a Fraud

by Kang Ricky on Nov.22, 2009, under

a fraud is an intentional deception made for personal gain or to damage another individual; the related adjective is fraudulent. The specific legal definition varies by legal jurisdiction. Fraud is a crime, and also a civil law violation. Defrauding people or entities of money or valuables is a common purpose of fraud, but there have also been fraudulent "discoveries", e.g. in science, to gain prestige rather than immediate monetary gain. A hoax also involves deception, but without the intention of gain, or of damaging or depriving the victim; the intention is often humorous. Cost of fraud The typical organization loses 5 percent of its annual revenue to fraud, with a median loss of $160,000. Frauds committed by owners and executives were more than nine times as costly as employee fraud. The industries most commonly affected are banking, manufacturing, and government. Types of fraudulent acts Fraud can be committed through many media, including mail, wire, phone, and the Internet (computer crime and Internet fraud). The international dimensions of the web and ease with which users can hide their location, the difficulty of checking identity and legitimacy online, and the simplicity with which crackers can divert browsers to dishonest sites and steal credit card details have all contributed to the very rapid growth of Internet fraud. Types of criminal fraud include: * bait and switch * bankruptcy fraud * benefit fraud, committing fraud to get government benefits * counterfeiting of currency, documents or valuable goods * charlatanism * confidence tricks such as the 419 fraud and Spanish Prisoner * creation of false companies or "long firms" * embezzlement, taking money which one has been entrusted with on behalf of another party * false advertising * false billing * false insurance claims * forgery of documents or signatures, * fraud upon the court * health fraud, for example selling of products known not to be effective, such as quack medicines, * identity theft * investment frauds, such as Ponzi schemes and Pyramid schemes * Moving scam * religious fraud * marriage fraud to obtain immigration rights without entitlement * rigged gambling games such as the shell game * securities frauds such as pump and dump * tax fraud, not reporting revenue or illegally avoiding taxes. In some countries, tax fraud is also prosecuted under false billing or tax forgery. More Info: Click Here
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What is a Confidence trick

by Kang Ricky on Nov.22, 2009, under

A confidence trick or confidence game (also known as a bunko, con, flim flam, gaffle, grift, hustle, scam, scheme, swindle or bamboozle) is an attempt to defraud a person or group by gaining their confidence. The victim is known as the mark, the trickster is called a confidence man, con man, confidence trickster, grifter, or con artist, and any accomplices are known as shills. Confidence men or women exploit characteristics of the human psyche such as greed, both dishonesty and honesty, vanity, compassion, credulity, irresponsibility, and naïveté. Confidence men or women have victimized individuals from all walks of life. History The first known usage of the term "confidence man" in English was in 1849; it was used by American press during the United States trial of William Thompson. Thompson chatted with strangers until he asked if they had the confidence to lend him their watches, whereupon he would walk off with the watch; he was captured when a victim recognized him on the street. Vulnerability to confidence tricks Confidence tricks exploit typical human qualities such as greed, dishonesty, vanity, honesty, compassion, credulity, irresponsibility and naïveté. The common factor is that the mark relies on the good faith of the con artist. Just as there is no typical profile for swindlers, neither is there one for their victims. Virtually anyone can fall prey to fraudulent crimes. ... Certainly victims of high-yield investment frauds may possess a level of greed which exceeds their caution as well as a willingness to believe what they want to believe. However, not all fraud victims are greedy, risk-taking, self-deceptive individuals looking to make a quick dollar. Nor are all fraud victims naïve, uneducated, or elderly. A greedy or dishonest mark may attempt to out-cheat the con artist, only to discover that he or she has been manipulated into losing from the very beginning. This is such a general principle in confidence tricks that there is a saying among con men that "you can't cheat an honest man." Shills, also known as accomplices, help manipulate the mark into accepting the con man's plan. In a traditional confidence trick, the mark is led to believe that he will be able to win money or some other prize by doing some task. The accomplices may pretend to be strangers who have benefited from performing the task in the past. More Info: click here
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What is a Cryptanalysis

by Kang Ricky on Nov.22, 2009, under

Cryptanalysis (from the Greek kryptós, "hidden", and analýein, "to loosen" or "to untie") is the study of methods for obtaining the meaning of encrypted information, without access to the secret information that is normally required to do so. Typically, this involves knowing how the system works and finding a secret key. In non-technical language, this is the practice of codebreaking or cracking the code, although these phrases also have a specialised technical meaning (see code). "Cryptanalysis" is also used to refer to any attempt to circumvent the security of other types of cryptographic algorithms and protocols in general, and not just encryption. However, cryptanalysis usually excludes methods of attack that do not primarily target weaknesses in the actual cryptography, such as bribery, physical coercion, burglary, keystroke logging, and social engineering, although these types of attack are an important concern and are often more effective than traditional cryptanalysis. Even though the goal has been the same, the methods and techniques of cryptanalysis have changed drastically through the history of cryptography, adapting to increasing cryptographic complexity, ranging from the pen-and-paper methods of the past, through machines like Bombes and Colossus computers in World War II, to the computer-based schemes of the present. The results of cryptanalysis have also changed — it is no longer possible to have unlimited success in codebreaking, and there is a hierarchical classification of what constitutes an attack. In the mid-1970s, a new class of cryptography was introduced: asymmetric cryptography. Methods for breaking these cryptosystems are typically radically different from before, and usually involve solving carefully-constructed problems in pure mathematics, the best-known being integer factorization. more info: click here
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What Is a Cold boot attack

by Kang Ricky on Nov.22, 2009, under

a cold boot attack (or to a lesser extent, a platform reset attack) is a type of side channel attack in which an attacker with physical access to a computer is able to retrieve encryption keys from a running operating system after using a cold reboot to restart the machine from a completely "off" state.The attack relies on the data remanence property of DRAM and SRAM to retrieve memory contents which remain readable in the seconds to minutes after power has been removed. Description To execute the attack, the machine is cold booted (power is cycled “off” then “on” without letting the computer shut down cleanly, or, if available, the “reset” button on the computer is pressed); a light-weight operating system is then immediately booted (e.g. from a USB flash drive), and the contents of pre-boot memory dumped to a file. Alternatively, the memory modules are removed from the original system and quickly placed in another machine under the attacker's control, which is then booted to access the memory. Further analysis can then be performed against the information that was retrieved from memory to find the sensitive keys contained in it (automated tools are now available to perform this task). The attack has been demonstrated to be effective against full disk encryption schemes of various vendors and operating systems, even where a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) secure cryptoprocessor is used. This is because the problem is fundamentally a hardware (insecure memory) and not a software issue. While the focus of current research is on disk encryption, any sensitive data held in memory are vulnerable to the attack. The time window for an attack can be extended to hours by cooling the memory modules. Furthermore, as the bits disappear in memory over time, they can be reconstructed, as they fade away in a predictable manner. In the case of disk encryption applications that can be configured to allow the operating system to boot without a pre-boot PIN being entered or a hardware key being present (e.g. Bitlocker in a simple configuration that uses a TPM without a two-factor authentication PIN or USB key), the time frame for the attack is not limited at all: “ Notably, using BitLocker with a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) sometimes makes it less secure, allowing an attacker to gain access to the data even if the machine is stolen while it is completely powered off. MORE INFO: CLICK HERE
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What Is A Cryptography

by Kang Ricky on Nov.22, 2009, under

Cryptography (or cryptology; from Greek κρυπτός, kryptos, "hidden, secret"; and γράφ, gráph, "writing", or -λογία, -logia, respectively)[1] is the practice and study of hiding information. Modern cryptography intersects the disciplines of mathematics, computer science, and engineering. Applications of cryptography include ATM cards, computer passwords, and electronic commerce. Cryptology prior to the modern age was almost synonymous with encryption, the conversion of information from a readable state to nonsense. The sender retained the ability to decrypt the information and therefore avoid unwanted persons being able to read it. Since WWI and the advent of the computer, the methods used to carry out cryptology have become increasingly complex and its application more widespread. Alongside the advancement in cryptology-related technology, the practice has raised a number of legal issues, some of which remain unresolved. Terminology Until modern times cryptography referred almost exclusively to encryption, which is the process of converting ordinary information (plaintext) into unintelligible gibberish (i.e., ciphertext). Decryption is the reverse, in other words, moving from the unintelligible ciphertext back to plaintext. A cipher (or cypher) is a pair of algorithms that create the encryption and the reversing decryption. The detailed operation of a cipher is controlled both by the algorithm and in each instance by a key. This is a secret parameter (ideally known only to the communicants) for a specific message exchange context. Keys are important, as ciphers without variable keys can be trivially broken with only the knowledge of the cipher used and are therefore useless (or even counter-productive) for most purposes. Historically, ciphers were often used directly for encryption or decryption without additional procedures such as authentication or integrity checks. In colloquial use, the term "code" is often used to mean any method of encryption or concealment of meaning. However, in cryptography, code has a more specific meaning. It means the replacement of a unit of plaintext (i.e., a meaningful word or phrase) with a code word (for example, wallaby replaces attack at dawn). Codes are no longer used in serious cryptography—except incidentally for such things as unit designations (e.g., Bronco Flight or Operation Overlord)—since properly chosen ciphers are both more practical and more secure than even the best codes and also are better adapted to computers. Cryptanalysis is the term used for the study of methods for obtaining the meaning of encrypted information without access to the key normally required to do so; i.e., it is the study of how to crack encryption algorithms or their implementations. Some use the terms cryptography and cryptology interchangeably in English, while others (including US military practice generally) use cryptography to refer specifically to the use and practice of cryptographic techniques and cryptology to refer to the combined study of cryptography and cryptanalysis.English is more flexible than several other languages in which cryptology (done by cryptologists) is always used in the second sense above. In the English Wikipedia the general term used for the entire field is cryptography (done by cryptographers). The study of characteristics of languages which have some application in cryptography (or cryptology), i.e. frequency data, letter combinations, universal patterns, etc., is called cryptolinguistics. More Info: CLICK HERE
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What is a Cipher

by Kang Ricky on Nov.22, 2009, under

a cipher (or cypher) is an algorithm for performing encryption or decryption — a series of well-defined steps that can be followed as a procedure. An alternative, less common term is encipherment. In non-technical usage, a “cipher” is the same thing as a “code”; however, the concepts are distinct in cryptography. In classical cryptography, ciphers were distinguished from codes. Codes operated by substituting according to a large codebook which linked a random string of characters or numbers to a word or phrase. For example, “UQJHSE” could be the code for “Proceed to the following coordinates”. When using a cipher the original information is known as plaintext, and the encrypted form as ciphertext. The ciphertext message contains all the information of the plaintext message, but is not in a format readable by a human or computer without the proper mechanism to decrypt it; it should resemble random gibberish to those not intended to read it. The operation of a cipher usually depends on a piece of auxiliary information, called a key or, in traditional NSA parlance, a cryptovariable. The encrypting procedure is varied depending on the key, which changes the detailed operation of the algorithm. A key must be selected before using a cipher to encrypt a message. Without knowledge of the key, it should be difficult, if not nearly impossible, to decrypt the resulting ciphertext into readable plaintext. Most modern ciphers can be categorized in several ways * By whether they work on blocks of symbols usually of a fixed size (block ciphers), or on a continuous stream of symbols (stream ciphers). * By whether the same key is used for both encryption and decryption (symmetric key algorithms), or if a different key is used for each (asymmetric key algorithms). If the algorithm is symmetric, the key must be known to the recipient and sender and to no one else. If the algorithm is an asymmetric one, the enciphering key is different from, but closely related to, the deciphering key. If one key cannot be deduced from the other, the asymmetric key algorithm has the public/private key property and one of the keys may be made public without loss of confidentiality. more info:click here
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Cyberspace Electronic Security Act (CESA)

by Kang Ricky on Nov.22, 2009, under

CESA (Cyberspace Electronic Security Act of 1999) is a bill enacted by the US Congress that allows the government the ability to harvest keys used in encryption. The Cyberspace Electronic Security Act (CESA) gives law enforcement the right to gain access to encryption keys and cryptography methods. The initial version of this act allowed federal law enforcement agencies to secretly use monitoring, electronic capturing equipment and other technologies to access and obtain information. These provisions were later stricken from the act, although federal law enforcement agencies were given a large amount of latitude to conduct investigations relating to electronic information. This act is generating a lot of discussion about what capabilities should be allowed to law enforcement in the detection of criminal activity.
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What is A Encryption

by Kang Ricky on Nov.22, 2009, under

Encryption is the process of transforming information (referred to as plaintext) using an algorithm (called cipher) to make it unreadable to anyone except those possessing special knowledge, usually referred to as a key. The result of the process is encrypted information (in cryptography, referred to as ciphertext). In many contexts, the word encryption also implicitly refers to the reverse process, decryption (e.g. “software for encryption” can typically also perform decryption), to make the encrypted information readable again (i.e. to make it unencrypted). Encryption has long been used by militaries and governments to facilitate secret communication. Encryption is now commonly used in protecting information within many kinds of civilian systems. For example, the Computer Security Institute reported that in 2007, 71% of companies surveyed utilized encryption for some of their data in transit, and 53% utilized encryption for some of their data in storage.Encryption can be used to protect data "at rest", such as files on computers and storage devices (e.g. USB flash drives). In recent years there have been numerous reports of confidential data such as customers' personal records being exposed through loss or theft of laptops or backup drives. Encrypting such files at rest helps protect them should physical security measures fail. Digital rights management systems which prevent unauthorized use or reproduction of copyrighted material and protect software against reverse engineering (see also copy protection) are another somewhat different example of using encryption on data at rest. Encryption is also used to protect data in transit, for example data being transferred via networks (e.g. the Internet, e-commerce), mobile telephones, wireless microphones, wireless intercom systems, Bluetooth devices and bank automatic teller machines. There have been numerous reports of data in transit being intercepted in recent years.Encrypting data in transit also helps to secure it as it is often difficult to physically secure all access to networks. Encryption, by itself, can protect the confidentiality of messages, but other techniques are still needed to protect the integrity and authenticity of a message; for example, verification of a message authentication code (MAC) or a digital signature. Standards and cryptographic software and hardware to perform encryption are widely available, but successfully using encryption to ensure security may be a challenging problem. A single slip-up in system design or execution can allow successful attacks. Sometimes an adversary can obtain unencrypted information without directly undoing the encryption. See, e.g., traffic analysis, TEMPEST, or Trojan horse. One of the earliest public key encryption applications was called Pretty Good Privacy (PGP). It was written in 1991 by Phil Zimmermann and was purchased by Network Associates (now PGP Corporation) in 1997. There are a number of reasons why an encryption product may not be suitable in all cases. First, e-mail must be digitally signed at the point it was created to provide non-repudiation for some legal purposes, otherwise the sender could argue that it was tampered with after it left their computer but before it was encrypted at a gateway. An encryption product may also not be practical when mobile users need to send e-mail from outside the corporate network.
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What Is A Trojan Horse

by Kang Ricky on Nov.22, 2009, under

The Trojan Horse is a tale from the Trojan War, as told in Virgil's Latin epic poem The Aeneid and by Quintus of Smyrna. The events in this story from the Bronze Age took place after Homer's Iliad, and before his Odyssey. It was the stratagem that allowed the Greeks finally to enter the city of Troy and end the conflict. In one version, after a fruitless 10-year siege, the Greeks constructed a huge wooden horse, and hid a select force of 30 men inside. The Greeks pretended to sail away, and the Trojans pulled the horse into their city as a victory trophy. That night the Greek force crept out of the horse and opened the gates for the rest of the Greek army, which had sailed back under cover of night. The Greek army entered and destroyed the city of Troy, decisively ending the war. In the Greek tradition, the horse is called Δούρειος Ἵππος, Doúreios Híppos, the "Gift Horse", in the Homeric Ionic dialect. Metaphorically a "Trojan Horse" has come to mean any trick or strategem that causes a target to invite a foe into a securely protected bastion or space. It is now often associated with "malware" computer programmes presented as useful or harmless to induce the user to install and run them.
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What Is A Cyberwarfare

by Kang Ricky on Nov.22, 2009, under

Cyberwarfare has been defined by government security expert Richard A. Clarke, in his book Cyber War (May 2010), as "actions by a nation-state to penetrate another nation's computers or networks for the purposes of causing damage or disruption.":6 The Economist describes cyber warfare as "the fifth domain of warfare," and William J. Lynn, U.S. Deputy Secretary of Defense, states that "as a doctrinal matter, the Pentagon has formally recognized cyberspace as a new domain in warfare . . . [which] has become just as critical to military operations as land, sea, air, and space." In 2009, President Barack Obama declared America’s digital infrastructure to be a "strategic national asset," and in May 2010 the Pentagon set up its new Cyber Command (Cybercom), headed by General Keith B. Alexander, director of the National Security Agency (NSA), to defend American military networks and attack other countries’ systems. The United Kingdom has also set up a cyber-security and "operations centre" based in Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ), the British equivalent of the NSA. In the U.S. however, Cyber Command is only set up to protect the military, whereas the government and corporate infrastructures are primarily the responsibility respectively of the Department of Homeland Security and private companies. The Economist writes that China has plans of “winning informationised wars by the mid-21st century”. They note that other countries are likewise organizing for cyberwar, among them Russia, Israel and North Korea. Iran boasts of having the world’s second-largest cyber-army. James Gosler, a government cybersecurity specialist, worries that the U.S. has a severe shortage of computer security specialists, estimating that there are only about 1,000 qualified people in the country today, but needs a force of 20,000 to 30,000 skilled experts. At the July 2010 Black Hat computer security conference, Michael Hayden, former deputy director of national intelligence, challenged thousands of attendees to help devise ways to "reshape the Internet's security architecture, explaining, "You guys made the cyberworld look like the north German plain." Methods of attack Cyberwarfare consists of many different threats Espionage and national security breaches Cyber espionage is the act or practice of obtaining secrets (sensitive, proprietary or classified information) from individuals, competitors, rivals, groups, governments and enemies also for military, political, or economic advantage using illegal exploitation methods on internet, networks, software and or computers. Classified information that is not handled securely can be intercepted and even modified, making espionage possible from the other side of the world. See Titan Rain and Moonlight Maze. General Alexander notes that the recently established Cyber Command is currently trying to determine whether such activities as commercial espionage or theft of intellectual property are criminal activities or actual "breaches of national security. More Info:wikipedia
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What Is A Hack (technology)

by Kang Ricky on Nov.22, 2009, under

Hacking (English verb to hack, singular noun a hack) refers to the re-configuring or re-programming of a system to function in ways not facilitated by the owner, administrator, or designer. The term(s) have several related meanings in the technology and computer science fields, wherein a "hack" may refer to a clever or quick fix to a computer program problem, or to what may be perceived to be a clumsy or inelegant (but usually relatively quick) solution to a problem, such as a "kludge". The terms "hack" and "hacking" are also used to refer to a modification of a program or device to give the user access to features that were otherwise unavailable, such as by circuit bending. It is from this usage that the term "hacking" is often used to refer to more nefarious criminal uses such as identity theft, credit card fraud or other actions categorized as computer crime. History The term "hack" was first used by US university computing centre staff in the mid-1960s. The context determined whether the complimentary or derogatory meanings were implied. Phrases such as "ugly hack" or "quick hack" generally referred to the latter meaning; phrases such as "cool hack" or "neat hack", to the former. In modern computer programming, a "hack" can refer to a solution or method which functions correctly but which is "ugly" in its concept, which works outside the accepted structures and norms of the environment, or which is not easily extendable or maintainable (see kludge). The programmer keeps beating on it until a solution is found. The jargon used by hackers is called "Hackish" (see the Jargon file). This should not be confused with "1337" or "leetspeak." In a similar vein, a "hack" may refer to works outside of computer programming. For example, a math hack means a clever solution to a mathematical problem. The GNU General Public License has been described as[who?] a copyright hack because it cleverly uses the copyright laws for a purpose the lawmakers did not foresee. All of these uses now also seem to be spreading beyond MIT as well. On many internet websites and in everyday language the word "hack" can be slang for "copy", "imitation" or "rip-off." A DIY musician probes the circuit board of a synthesizer for "bends" using a jeweler's screwdriver and alligator clips The term has since acquired an additional and now more common meaning, since approximately the 1980s; this more modern definition was initially associated with crackers. This growing use of the term "hack" is to refer to a program that (sometimes illegally) modifies another program, often a computer game, giving the user access to features otherwise inaccessible to them. As an example of this use, for Palm OS users (until the 4th iteration of this operating system), a "hack" refers to an extension of the operating system which provides additional functionality. The general media also uses this term to describe the act of illegally breaking into a computer, but this meaning is disputed. This term also refers to those people who cheat on video games using special software. This can also refer to the jailbreaking of iPods. The term is additionally used by electronics hobbyists to refer to simple modifications to electronic hardware such as a graphing calculators, video game consoles, electronic musical keyboards or other device (see CueCat for a notorious example) to expose or add functionality to a device that was unintended for use by end users by the company who created it. A number of techno musicians have modified 1980s-era Casio SK-1 sampling keyboards to create unusual sounds by doing circuit bending: connecting wires to different leads of the integrated circuit chips. The results of these DIY experiments range from opening up previously inaccessible features that were part of the chip design to producing the strange, dis-harmonic digital tones that became part of the techno music style. Companies take different attitudes towards such practices, ranging from open acceptance (such as Texas Instruments for its graphing calculators and Lego for its Lego Mindstorms robotics gear) to outright hostility (such as Microsoft's attempts to lock out Xbox hackers or the DRM routines on Blu-ray Disc players designed to sabotage compromised players). MORE Info: Wikipedia How to Become a Hacker by Eric Raymond History of Hacking Video Series by Discovery Channel "Bit Twiddling Hacks" By Sean Eron Anderson
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What is a Digital wallet

by Kang Ricky on Nov.22, 2009, under

A digital wallet (also known as an e-wallet) allows users to make electronic commerce transactions quickly and securely. A digital wallet functions much like a physical wallet. The digital wallet was first conceived as a method of storing various forms of electronic money (e-cash), but with little popularity of such e-cash services, the digital wallet has evolved into a service that provides internet users with a convenient way to store and use online shopping information. Technology A digital wallet has both a software and information component. The software provides security and encryption for the personal information and for the actual transaction. Typically, digital wallets are stored on the client side and are easily self-maintained and fully compatible with most e-commerce Web sites. A server-side digital wallet, also known as a thin wallet, is one that an organization creates for and about you and maintains on its servers. Server-side digital wallets are gaining popularity among major retailers due to the security, efficiency, and added utility it provides to the end-user, which increases their enjoyment of their overall purchase. The information component is basically a database of user-inputted information. This information consists of your shipping address, billing address, payment methods (including credit card numbers, expiry dates, and security numbers), and other information. Setup and Use A client side digital wallet requires minimal setup and is relatively easy to use. Once the software is installed, the user begins by entering all the pertinent information. The digital wallet is now setup. At the purchase/check-out page of an e-commerce site, the digital wallet software has the ability to automatically enter the user information in the online form. By default, most digital wallets prompt when the software recognizes a form in which it can fill out, if you chose to automatically fill out the form, you will be prompted for a password. This keeps unauthorized users from viewing personal information stored on a particular computer. for this reason main benefit of this type of wallet is that you do not need to complete forms. instead once you fill your account info in your client side wallet in first time,it is enough for other use. Advantages for e-commerce sites Upwards of 25% of online shoppers abandon their order due to frustration in filling in forms. (Graphic Arts Monthly, 1999) The digital wallet combats this problem by giving users the option to transfer their information securely and accurately. This simplified approach to completing transactions results in better usability and ultimately more utility for the customer. more info:wikipedia
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What is a Micropayment

by Kang Ricky on Nov.22, 2009, under

A micropayment is a financial transaction involving a very small sum of money. PayPal defines a micropayment as a transaction of less than 12 USD,and though micropayments were originally envisioned to involve much smaller sums of money, practical systems to allow transactions of less than 1 USD have not been developed. One problem that has prevented their emergence is a need to keep costs for individual transactions low, which is impractical when transacting such small sums, even if the transaction fee is just a few cents. History Micropayments were initially devised as a way of allowing the sale of online content and were envisioned to involve small sums of only a few cents. These transactions would enable people to sell content on the Internet and would be an alternative to advertising revenue. During the late 1990s, there was a movement to create microtransaction standards, and the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) worked on incorporating micropayments into HTML, even going as far as to suggest the embedding of payment-request information in HTTP error codes.The W3C has since stopped its efforts in this area, and micropayments have not become a widely used method of selling content over the internet. Online gaming The term microtransaction is sometimes used to refer to the sale of virtual goods in online games like World of Warcraft.
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What is a Marketplace

by Kang Ricky on Nov.22, 2009, under

A marketplace is the space, actual, virtual or metaphorical, in which a market operates. The term is also used in a trademark law context to denote the actual consumer environment, ie. the 'real world' in which products and services are provided and consumed. Internet Marketplaces The growing prevalence of Internet access has enabled new markets to emerge online. One example is eBay, a globally available auction house for products. The Internet has also allowed other marketplaces to thrive by connecting buyers and sellers from disparate locations. The formation of online marketplaces often occurs quickly in response to social or economic trends. Craigslist is another website that allows the public to trade goods and services. Internet marketplaces can further be categorized as B2B , B2C and C2C marketplaces.
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depreciation-depreciation method-depreciation methods-FastLineWealthStraight line forced cycler No Ref or selling required to earn

by Kang Ricky on Nov.22, 2009, under

» This program is straight-line NO Level Deep, every 4th person that join after you (regardless the referrer) will forced you to cycle and earn. » The Cost is only $23 one time fee - for lifetime membership no monthly fee and no hidden cost,You will receive 5,000 banner impression credit per position to promote your business and you can starting to cycle and earn multiple times, including a FREE re-entry (worth $23) every completed cycle. »You can earn $10 every completed cycle, You can cycle and earn multiple times on a week or even in a day »You can earn $5 Matching Bonuses for completed cycle of every referrals you have »You will Automatically re-Entry to program after completed the cycle for FREE ($23 value) »You will receive revenue share every purchased new positions after your positions (regardless the referrer). .payment methods you accept ? » We accept Credit and Debit cards via Alertpay. »accept international members over 190 countries worldwide. » You can make more earning by referring new members and you can earn $5 Matching Bonuses for every completed cycle of referrals you have. You can receive Matching Bonus multiple times!! »can withdraw anytime you want (min. $15), We pays daily! and will be transferred to your Alertpay. (max. 24 hours) without any deduction fee.Join Now.
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paid to read-gepaid to read-paid to read sites-paid to read articles-best paid to read-get paid to read articles-

by Kang Ricky on Nov.22, 2009, under

readbudst ini adalah bisnis terbaru yang sangat mudah di jalankan.hanya dengan membaca artikel dan memberi rating bagus tidak artikel itu maka anda akan mendapat bayaran dari bisnis paid to read articles ini.anda dibayar tergantung dari penyedia bisnis ini memberi harga untuk membaca dan memberi rating artikel,paling kecil bayaran per artikel $0.06.anda akan dapat penghasilan lebih apabila anda mengajak teman atau keluarga anda. anda akan dibayar $5 setiap anda bisa mengajak teman atau keluarga anda,conto bila anda mengajak 100 orang,maka 100x$5 =$500 wah banyak juga ya itu penghasilan gratis yang menakjubkan.dan kamu juga bisa menjadi affiliate program readbudst,di sini anda di haruskan mengajak semua orang untuk bergabung ke bisnis paid to read articles ini dan anda akan dibayar $5 setiap ada orang yang bergabung ke readbudst.bila anda bisa mengajak 50 orang saja 50x$5= $250 apalagi kalo anda bisa mengajak lebih banyak lagi.anda bisa kaya mendadak dengan mendapatkan penghasilan gratis.uang penghasilan anda baru bisa di bawa apabila sudah mencapai $50 baru anda bisa mengambilnya dan pembayaran nya lewat palpal.anda sudah punya bank paypal belum kalo belum CLICK DI DINI. sebelum anda keduluan sama orang lain buruan anda gabung sekarang,lebih terlambat dari pada tidak mengikuti sama sekali apalagi bisnis ini tidak susah sama sekali. hanya membaca artikel dan memberi rating artikel yang anda baca.GABUNG SEKARANG readbud - get paid to read and rate articles
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